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Protecting plant diversity

The Comox Valley Seed Bank was created to preserve and maintain a collection of viable, open-pollinated, non-GMO, organically grown food seeds that are well-adapted to the growing conditions of the Comox Valley. - Photo submitted
The Comox Valley Seed Bank was created to preserve and maintain a collection of viable, open-pollinated, non-GMO, organically grown food seeds that are well-adapted to the growing conditions of the Comox Valley.
— image credit: Photo submitted

COMOX VALLEY — Vivien Adams understands the urgency behind food security, as she has seen first-hand the decrease of commercial vegetable varieties of seeds.

Adams is the co-ordinator behind the Comox Valley Seed Bank — a sub-group from the Comox Valley Growers and Seeds Savers which aims to preserve and maintain a collection of viable, open-pollinated, non-GMO, organically grown food seeds that are well-adapted to the growing conditions of the Comox Valley.

“There is an enormous diversity of veggie varieties which produce so many different flavours,” Adams said. “Multi-national plant companies patent certain varieties and it’s gone forever. It’s a threat to the plant diversity.”

Over the past 100 years, 96 per cent of commercial vegetable varieties have been lost, Adams noted.

She explained hybrid seeds, those which are crossed, were created by companies for a variety of reasons, including commercial traits such as a longer shelf life, vegetables which travel well, and increasing sweetness.

As a result, many small seed companies have been bought up by the larger corporations.

Adams added hybrid seeds require the grower to purchase new seeds every year.

Heritage, heirloom, open-pollinated or non-hybridized seeds are those that when planted, grow true, she said.

Due to the significant decrease in open-pollinated seeds, she said the Seeds Savers “wanted to take it to another level.

“We are growing (the seeds) out year after year for them to become adapted to local conditions and climate change.”

Adams said the Seed Bank is now in its second year of operation, with a growing group of around 30 people growing and contributing to the bank.

The bank is a living seed bank, as the seeds which are stored have been tried out during seasons with a variety of conditions.

In 2012, some of the seeds saved include 15 types of beans, beets, winter squash, tomatoes, buckwheat and Ethiopian wheat.

For those unsure how to save seeds and donate them to the bank, member and fellow gardener Ellen Rainwalker said two long-time members — Nick and Anna Guthrie — will visit homes and assist in the process of saving seeds.

She noted the process with the bank begins with members taking 20 seeds and signing a contract which says they will monitor the performance of the seed throughout the year.

For more information or to join the Seed Bank, contact Adams at 250-338-8341 or vivienadams1@hotmail.com

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